Meet Nibi who’s try­ing to start a nat­u­ral move­ment in Nige­ria :)

Where are you from?
N:
I live in Lagos, Nige­ria and work in finance. I was born here, grew up in the UK, and moved back to Nige­ria just over 4 years ago

What is the nat­u­ral hair scene like in Nige­ria?
N:
It’s pret­ty much reject­ed here for the most part. When I first moved back, I would con­stant­ly get com­ments at work espe­cial­ly (I worked in a bank), and have peo­ple ask­ing me why I was nat­u­ral and offer­ing to relax my hair for me. I’ve been referred to as a “tree hug­ger”, amongst oth­er things, and peo­ple have act­ed like I was mak­ing some sort of state­ment wear­ing my hair nat­u­ral, when in real­i­ty, I just prefer the way it looks. I just found it all quite amus­ing.

Recent­ly I have start­ed to see more nat­u­ral heads around, but they are still in the minor­i­ty. Apart from the stig­ma sur­round­ing nat­u­ral hair (relaxed hair is still pret­ty much seen as the most accept­able), there are a lot of peo­ple who try to go nat­u­ral but don’t know how. They use the wrong prod­ucts with hor­ri­ble ingre­di­ents, and so their hair is pret­ty unman­age­able and not know­ing what to do they hit the relax­er again. I start­ed get­ting a lot of peo­ple ask­ing me about my hair, how I found it so easy to man­age, etc. And so I began infor­mal­ly dis­pens­ing advice, and have helped a lot of peo­ple to go nat­u­ral or start tran­si­tion­ing.

The main prob­lem I encoun­tered when advis­ing peo­ple in Lagos to stop using sul­phate sham­poos, or prod­ucts with min­er­al oil, or to cut down on the cones used, they’d ask me for speci­fic prod­ucts they could use, and there was noth­ing in Nige­ria I could rec­om­mend. That’s why I decid­ed to start “The Kinky Apothe­cary”. I sup­ply prod­ucts that before now were impos­si­ble to get here. I make sure every­thing we sup­ply is free of the nasty ingre­di­ents I men­tioned above, so that even if peo­ple don’t have time to read labels, or under­stand ingre­di­ents, they can be assured that we’ve done it for them. Prod­ucts range from the pop­u­lar lines like Aubrey Organ­ics and Gio­van­ni, which are impos­si­ble to find here, to lesser known prod­ucts, such as total­ly nat­u­ral prod­ucts made by peo­ple here and in oth­er West African coun­tries.

There is an abun­dance of good nat­u­ral ingre­di­ents in Nige­ria that our hair loves, such as shea but­ter, aloe vera, coconut oil, etc, so I teach peo­ple how to use what’s around them, but also try and make them aware of issues like the dif­fer­ences between oil and mois­ture, so they don’t just end up slather­ing shea but­ter onto dry hair and won­der­ing why they end up with a bird’s nest. Even­tu­al­ly, I’m also going to devel­op my own line of prod­ucts and the process is already in full swing. I believe that all this will con­tribute to chang­ing the nat­u­ral scene in Lagos, and it will become more com­mon and accept­ed over time.

When did you go nat­u­ral?
N:
I first went nat­u­ral 11 years ago. I main­ly did it because I exper­i­ment­ed with my hair a lot at the time. A friend of mine went nat­u­ral because her hair was break­ing off, and I loved her twists. At the time I had a short relaxed hair cut. I gen­er­al­ly hat­ed going to get my hair relaxed as I would ALWAYS get burns, and I have nev­er real­ly liked oth­er peo­ple doing my hair. So one day I just decid­ed not to get a touch up. About 2 months after mak­ing the deci­sion, I chopped off the relaxed ends.

In the begin­ning, I still treat­ed my hair pret­ty bad­ly, and would go to hair­dressers here and attract a lot of atten­tion with the smoke ris­ing from my blowouts and the hand­fuls of hair fly­ing every­where. None of the hair­dressers knew how to han­dle it, so there was a lot of rough treat­ment (e.g comb­ing as if it was the most resilient hair-type when in real­i­ty it’s the most del­i­cate).

I have done every imag­in­able thing to my hair — includ­ing dying it red myself using store-bought dyes. Mirac­u­lous­ly it didn’t all break off, but the heat dam­age was pret­ty spe­cial. I then hit the kid­die perm, regret­ting it instant­ly and tran­si­tioned back to nat­u­ral almost straight away. That’s when I start­ed doing a lot of research, found all the forums and blogs and got a prop­er under­stand­ing of nat­u­ral hair. Its only in the past 2 to 3 years that I’ve real­ly learned about the impor­tance of prod­ucts and ingre­di­ents, and how to prop­er­ly take care of it.

I would say the sim­plest ver­sion of my regime is cow­ash with Herbal Essences Hel­lo Hydra­tion or Trader Joe’s Nour­ish Spa, deep con­di­tion with Aubrey Organ­ics Hon­ey­suck­le Rose Con­di­tion­er (although I have recent­ly dis­cov­ered Elu­cence Mois­ture Bal­anc­ing Con­di­tion­er and am in love), apply Gio­van­ni Direct Leave-in (Or Elu­cence again) to my hair in sec­tions, and then twist (fat or small, depend­ing on my mood) with my home made Shealoe whip, and seal the ends with cas­tor oil. I nor­mal­ly just pin the twists up dur­ing the week, spray every night with a mix­ture of leave in, water and cas­tor oil, and then I twist-out for the week­end. I do get bored eas­i­ly, and exper­i­ment with oth­er styles, but this is my go-to rou­tine.

What would you like to see in Nige­ria in terms of hair­care?
N:
It would be great if there were salons ded­i­cat­ed to nat­u­ral hair care, that under­stood the impor­tance of ingre­di­ents, and actu­al­ly knew how to han­dle hair. Peo­ple think they know, but in real­i­ty have no clue.

Is there a blog/webpage where we can find you?
N:
I have a Face­book page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Kinky-Apothecary/ and the blog, which will be linked to that page, will be going up in the next few days.

The Kinky Apothe­cary is launch­ing with a nat­u­ral hair work­shop called Cham­pag­ne, Cup­cakes & Curltalk where we will cov­er over­haul­ing people’s regimes and gen­er­al nat­u­ral hair main­te­nance, giv­ing tips on tran­si­tion­ing, under­stand­ing ingre­di­ents, and will also intro­duce prod­ucts. The first will be this Sat­ur­day, May 8th, but I intend to hold the­se peri­od­i­cal­ly every few months.

Black Girl With Long Hair

Leila Noel­lis­te, founder of Black Girl with Long Hair (April 2008). Social media, pop cul­ture and black beau­ty enthu­si­ast. bell hooks’ hair twin…

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43 Comments on "Nibi in Nigeria // Natural Hair Style Icon"

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those are usu­al­ly two real objec­tives behind…

arti­cle writ­ing, cor­rect? to get the most from your efforts start with the­se arti­cle writ­ing basics.# 1 do research­first, you must do some research. this should be two-fold. before you start writ­ing you need to know what your read­ers will want…

towing a truck

Great – I should def­i­nite­ly pro­nounce, impressed with your web­site. I had no trou­ble nav­i­gat­ing through all tabs and relat­ed infor­ma­tion end­ed up being tru­ly easy to do to access. I recent­ly found what I hoped for before you know it in the least. Rea­son­ably unusu­al. Is like­ly to appre­ci­ate it for those who add forums or some­thing, site the­me . a tones way for your client to com­mu­ni­cate. Nice task.

Kator
Yaaay! Nibi, it’s great to see you on bglh! Your hair is so beautiful.You have been a great help, i’m going to start being a Kinky Apothe­cary cus­tomer soon! lol Well, i am Nige­ri­an, i live in Lagos and i have been nat­u­ral for 3 years. I have got­ten beau­ti­ful com­pli­ments and even had strangers walk up to me and touch my hair. The only neg­a­tive com­ments i have got­ten were all in the line of, “when are you going to relax your hair” or “it’s just a phase, you will soon go back to relax­ers”. Harm­less stuff! But the one… Read more »
Megan
Its kind of iron­ic that here in Amer­i­ca, going nat­u­ral is you sup­pos­ed­ly try­ing to go back to your ‘roots’ but not even the wom­en where we come from has accept­ed the hair God has given them yet. I’m also Nige­ri­an liv­ing in the US. My par­ents have seen me do any and every­thing to my head so they’re nev­er sur­prised any­more lol. I’ve been nat­u­ral on and off all of my life but Ill nev­er get anoth­er relax­er again! I will be in my cas­ket with a big giant afro wait­ing for my judg­ment from God. Why mess with… Read more »
Morenike

I am also Nige­ri­an and new­ly nat­u­ral (4 months now). I under­stand what peo­ple would prob­a­bly say know­ing nige­ri­ans. My moth­er saw my hair at first and straight up called it ugly. After 2 weeks, she then got accus­tomed to it. After a mon­th, she was help­ing me do my twists. And after about 2 months, she is begin­ning to tran­si­tion! The thing is that we Nige­ri­an wom­en who are nat­u­ral can change the stig­ma by show­ing oth­er black wom­en how beau­ti­ful we are with­out the remi brazil­lian or ini­d­i­an hair.
thank
ps I love your fro!

Feyi
I’m a Nige­ri­an but I live in the US (DMV area). I have nev­er per­med my hair, since I was lit­tle I always braid it but I’ve also always hat­ed it. Every time I took it out peo­ple would com­pli­ment me but that wasn’t the issue, it was me look­ing in the mir­ror and not see­ing a pret­ty girl because my hair was nap­py that made me hate my hair. For a long time I kept my hair in braids until one day I took it out and I real­ized that my hair got way past my shoul­ders and if… Read more »
Nnennaya

I have joined Nibi’s Kinky Apothe­cary blog. And am so look­ing for­ward to her next edi­tion of Cham­pag­ne, Cup­cakes & Curltalk com­ing this July. Every since I bumbed in BGLH, I have gone Afro Crazy!!!
So hav­ing an ‘Afro’ com­mu­ni­ty here in Nai­ja is a wel­com­ing idea.
Way to go Nibi!!!!

Tayo

I tran­si­tioned about 2 years ago and now cur­rent­ly wear­ing my hair out. My mom hates it and request that I get it relaxed like I used too. She went as far as ask­ing my sis­ter to beg me to perm my hair. I’m Nige­ri­an and it is ridicu­lous that our kinky hair is reject­ed by our own kind. I love what you are doing there, please keep it up!

Peju

No nat­u­ral move­ment in Nai­ja? is she seri­ous.. no sis.. I applaud you for try­ing to bring Euro­pean prod­ucts home but um, this is what we do in Nai­ja!

I was just home about 2 months ago and most wom­en have nat­u­ral hair they just braid it and do not wear it as Afro.… which of course I think i pret­ty but I under­stand it’s hard to man­age for any wom­an. but um no, there are tons with natru­al un relaxed hair, they just braid it for the most part and that is OUR move­ment.

Yvette

I love this post! Although I’m not Nige­ri­an (I’m Ghana­ian) I can def­i­nite­ly relate. The same thing going on over there is what’s going on in Ghana and with those in abroad. When I went back home, I was shocked to see so many of my fam­i­ly mem­bers, from 5 — 60 years old, with relaxed hair. They’ve def­i­nite­ly tak­en on the West­ern ide­als, almost to the extreme, and embrac­ing nat­u­ral hair is going to be a rough road. It’s great that you’re try­ing to start at home first. Kudos :)

Ada

@abby
how do you fal­si­fy peo­ples expe­ri­ences when you do not know them?e are you imply­ing that the sto­ries they are told are false? your expe­ri­ence might be total­ly dif­fer­ent from theirs but that does­nt make theirs incor­rect. so there is no “notion for you to cor­rect” mmmkay
and with­out even hav­ing two heads it is quite is easy to see just walk­ing the streets of nige­ria that nat­u­ral hair is not the major­i­ty. please do not belit­tle peooples expe­ri­ences it is quite rude

Nibi
@ Abby- Thank you very much for your com­ment. I wasn’t going to respond indi­vid­u­al­ly, but I felt that I had to answer yours.  I start­ed The Kinky Apothe­cary based on MY expe­ri­ences, and the expe­ri­ences of peo­ple who approached me and asked about my hair. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, I did not invent the fact that peo­ple have and fre­quent­ly do make neg­a­tive com­ments about my hair. At the work­shop on sat­ur­day, quite a few peo­ple men­tioned that they had expe­ri­enced neg­a­tive reac­tions to their hair, espe­cial­ly at work. One lady told us how she had once been sent home by her… Read more »
abby
See…I com­mend you cos I know that what you are doing is for a good cause.Nevertheless, I will like to cor­rect one notion.That a per­son car­ries nat­u­ral hair in nige­ria doesn’t make them a “MINORITY” as you put it. I am nige­ri­an, lived the first 19years of my life in nige­ria so I know. Yes, peo­ple with nat­u­ral hair are first seen as reli­gious because there are church­es in nige­ria that pro­mote that but that is about it. Peo­ple don’t call you names because you have nat­u­ral hair. No, it is very accept­ed, yes very hard to main­tain cos of… Read more »
Nibi
Thank you guys for all your won­der­ful, sup­port­ive com­ments. I real­ly am touched. And its so great to hear from so many oth­er nat­u­ral Nige­ri­ans. Its sad to hear we’ve all expe­ri­enced neg­a­tiv­i­ty as a result of choos­ing to wear our hair the way it was given to us, espe­cial­ly at home, but hope­ful­ly this will all change even­tu­al­ly. The work­shop yes­ter­day showed me that it has already begun. I’ve had the same com­ments where peo­ple sug­gest you can’t be ‘ful­ly black’ if your hair grows long or if its curly, or they are con­vinced its a weave, or say… Read more »
Lara

Kudos to you & your endeav­ors, Nibi! I love read­ing about my Nat­u­ral Nige­ri­an sis­ters — it lets me know that we all haven’t suc­cumbed to the creamy crack! I’m based out of the U.S. & I haven’t got­ten to chance to go back home yet — but I’m glad that you’re reach­ing out to those who are new to being Nat­u­ral!

Again, kudos! =)

kechy
21.CO 8 May 2010 at 9:40 am Perma­link Ahh this is excit­ing. I am Nige­ri­an as well, nat­u­ral for about 9 years now. I would love to meet up with the oth­er nige­ri­ans locat­ed in the abj area. Is it pos­si­ble to get the con­tact info of Nibi so I can fur­ther dis­cuss with her. THANKS I wore my hair nat­u­ral and i got some pos­i­tive com­ments. How­ev­er got some along the lines of why is a grown wom­an still car­ry­ing vir­gin hair, don’t you want to relax your hair, why don’t you do your hair. [Thank­ful­ly I love my… Read more »
CO
Ahh this is excit­ing. I am Nige­ri­an as well, nat­u­ral for about 9 years now. I would love to meet up with the oth­er nige­ri­ans locat­ed in the abj area. Is it pos­si­ble to get the con­tact info of Nibi so I can fur­ther dis­cuss with her. THANKS I wore my hair nat­u­ral and i got some pos­i­tive com­ments. How­ev­er got some along the lines of why is a grown wom­an still car­ry­ing vir­gin hair, don’t you want to relax your hair, why don’t you do your hair. Thank­ful­ly I love my hair and just looked at folks as though… Read more »
Mz.T
It’s sooo great to see this! I’m Nige­ri­an too. I did my BC 4years ago when I was in TX. I moved back to Nige­ria this year and start­ed wear­ing my puff… Let me tell you the recep­tion has been hor­ri­ble. Some girls ask if my hair is a weave and don’t believe when I say it’s not. Some peo­ple have asked why I’m nat­u­ral (what kind of ques­tion is that) like it’s a bad thing. Find­ing prod­ucts here in Nige­ria real­ly is dif­fi­cult, so I will def­i­nite­ly be con­tact­ing you about that. I haven’t phys­i­cal­ly seen any oth­er nat­u­ral female… Read more »
Cherri

More pow­er to you Nibi! This sounds great!

Black Married Momma

ChiNige­ri­an,

That’s it — dada hair! I once had a friend from Nige­ria in high school and ear­ly col­lege who men­tioned that term to me. This was years ago, but I remem­ber she said they believe locks are the symp­tom of a deranged indi­vid­u­al.

So, if I went to Nige­ria right now (where DNA test­ing links my pater­nal DNA — Yoruba), they would think I was off my rock­er!? That is so bizarre, espe­cial­ly see­ing how Nige­ri­an broth­ers I have met LOVED this sis­ter when I was still sin­gle!

Michelle

It hurts me to know that you can’t even wear your hair nat­u­ral in West Africa..that’s crazy to me. I don’t see any­thing wrong with straight­en­ing it, but to belive that you HAVE to straighten..in Africa..sounds nutts..It goes to show that colo­nial­ism affect­ed Africans as well as it’s dias­po­ra. I also can’t believe that black wom­en accept the fact that sodi­um hydrox­ide is ok to use for their hair. Why can’t sci­en­tists come up with some­thing bet­ter, there are cars run­ning off of water but sodi­um hydrox­ide is still used on hair? It’s ridicu­lous.

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[…] This post was men­tioned on Twit­ter by Black Girl Long Hair, Leave In The Kinks. Leave In The Kinks said: Sup­port the nat­u­ral move­ment in Lagos!! http://bglhonline.com/2010/05/nfatw-nibi-in-nigeria/ […]

Nena
Im a nige­ri­an nat­u­ral new­bie (BC’d Christ­mas day 09). Sad­ly i’v hard­ly worn my real hair out, i keep it hid­den under weaves n wat nots for work.It breaks my heart that my beau­ti­ful coils can­not see or breathe bcos of the soci­ety in which i live. Nige­ri­an wom­en cringe @ the thot of let­ting go of the their relax­ers and i’v had friends say things like “take off yr clothes n walk the streets in the nude, so every1 knows you’ve gone mad,” or “U have to have some white in you to go nat­u­ral.” I’v seen so many… Read more »
Eniola

My God, I near­ly cried with joy when I saw this. Nige­ri­ans liv­ing abroad in the US and the UK already know how hard it is to be nat­u­ral, with the abuse com­ing main­ly from your fam­i­ly (the plain­tive stares are the worst.…) and I’m so glad that some­one is in Nige­ria them­selves, start­ing a mini rev­o­lu­tion!

I hope God bless­es your endeav­ours! :D
x

Ruky
This is so inspir­ing. I’m lit­er­al­ly the only Nige­ri­an in my cir­cle with Nat­u­ral hair. I’ve got my younger sis­ter on the band wag­on & I think she was inspired because I did not back down in spite of the “jokes” and “sil­ly com­ments” of tak­ing my “African-ness” to anoth­er lev­el (what­ev­er that means). We are NOT allowed to wear our nat­u­ral hair out for our sister’s wed­ding this sum­mer in Nigeria(it is NOT an option). I dis­cussed the idea of locs to a few old­er wom­en. Their advice — “Do what­ev­er you want, Loc it, Tie it, Shave it… Read more »
AtEase

Nige­ri­an matri­archs can be HILARIOUS:

“Do what­ev­er you want, Loc it, Tie it, Shave it all off, what­ev­er – as long as you get MARRIED FIRST”

Rofl!

I real­ize this state­ment could have been painful and blunt. But hon­est­ly with cer­tain rel­a­tives you just have to laugh. They mean well.

chinigerian

@black mar­ried momma.…EVEN WORST.…they call it dada hair…i know cause i have locs and it is a no no in Nigeria..I don’t care any­more though, i don’t fit any of the neg­a­tive stereo­types of loc wear­ers but ppl still judge, im a pas­tors kid so its even harder,i love NIge­ria and go often but my dad says i cant come to nige­ria with my hair locked. I have only one life to live…i cant live it for oth­ers. Espe­cial­ly when oth­er are wrong.
Ex-con­formist
http://thesimplynatural1.blogspot.com/

Black Married Momma

This is such an inter­est­ing pro­file.

How are locks viewed in Nige­ria? I have heard that they are cor­re­lat­ed with men­tal ill­ness or dev­il­ment. I’d love to hear your take.

Vonmiwi

Good luck to her because to have nat­u­ral hair is now a no-no in Nige­ria. Some wom­en believe it’s not “Afropoli­tan” enough to expose our roots.

Jacquie

Yay!!! Go Nige­ria :)

I’m from Lon­don, but my her­itage is Nige­ri­an and when­ev­er I vist there, they are so shocked that some­one from the West has nat­u­ral hair. They stare, ask ques­tions and tut… but I take this all in my stride. 

So pleased to hear there is a shift in atti­tudes, and this love­ly lady, Nibi is help­ing oth­ers to learn more about their hair types. She has such love­ly hair too!

http://magdaleneloves.blogspot.com

C.O

I absolute­ly love this. It’s great that you’re try­ing to heigth­en aware­ness on nat­u­ral hair back home. This is a beau­ti­ful thing!!!

& you have lus­cious hair.

Anuli

I love this idea. It’s hard to be a nat­u­ral Nige­ri­an because relaxed hair is the hair of choice there.

kechy

oh my gosh. nibi. i live in Port Har­court and trust me there is real­ly noth­ing here i could use on my hair. so i try to go to do every­thing from for­mu­lat­ing to what have you. i don’t even use a sham­poo. i use Dudu Osun black soap. my dear i real­ly do need to check out your link because i real­ly need prod­ucts like mad and thanks for mak­ing feel like I’m not the only NATURAL NIGERIAN IN NIGERIA.

ScrewyHair
Great sto­ry. I’m Nige­ri­an, moved back home from the US 4 years ago, and I’ve had nat­u­ral hair almost 12 years now. My sister’s been nat­u­ral almost 13 years and one of my broth­ers has the most gor­geous locks that are down to the mid­dle of his back now. I did a big chop about a mon­th ago for sev­er­al rea­sons, one of them being that I let the salons touch my hair :-) and anoth­er being that I need­ed to learn how to take care of my hair in a dif­fer­ent cli­mate. (I’d been in the US 10 years.)… Read more »
kechy

oh my gosh. nibi. i live in Port Har­court and trust me there is real­ly noth­ing here i could on my hair. so i try to go to do every­thing from for­mu­lat­ing to what have you. i don’t even use a sham­poo. i use Dudu Osun black soap. my dear i real­ly do need to check out your sit because i real­ly need prod­ucts like mad and thanks for mak­ing feel like I’m not the only NATURAL NIGERIAN IN NIGERIA.

puff

It makes me so hap­py to see a fel­low nat­u­ral Nige­ri­an doing it big! :) Your hair is gor­geous, and I’m sure you’ll inspire more of our fel­low coun­try­wom­en to leave the relax­er behind.

ScrewyHair
Great sto­ry. I’m Nige­ri­an, moved back home from the US 4 years ago, and I’ve had nat­u­ral hair almost 12 years now. My sister’s been nat­u­ral almost 13 years and one of my broth­ers has the most gor­geous locks that are down to the mid­dle of his back now. I did a big chop about a mon­th ago for sev­er­al rea­sons, one of them being that I let the salons touch my hair :-) and anoth­er being that I need­ed to learn how to take care of my hair in a dif­fer­ent cli­mate. (I’d been in the US 10 years.)… Read more »
NappturallyNigerian
Wow Nibi you have love­ly hair!  As a British/Nigerian I am so glad to see more Nige­ri­an sis­ters advo­cat­ing nat­u­ral hair in Nige­ria, and pro­mot­ing it through great sites like bglhonline.com. I went to Nige­ria last year after I did my BC and received soo many neg­a­tive com­ments, and most of them sad­ly were from my own fam­i­ly. Despite being told that I had reduced my bride price, it didn’t deter me thank God! But I can com­plete­ly relate to your expe­ri­ence, so thanks for shar­ing. I am very much proud to be Nige­ri­an and British, and wish more Nige­ri­an wom­en… Read more »
dammie sobowale

Wow!!! Nibi, am also a Nige­ria i live in Lagos but cur­rent­ly in Abu­ja on nysc… i work in a bank too, am new­ly natural(bc-nov)and i wear my hair most in braids and wigs. when i try to wear my hair out, i get seri­ous looks and comments…thanks, u real­ly inspire me.

Ada

omg my heart is so warm right now. I have always won­dered what the hell I’ll do if I go back home and how my hair will cope.
now I know who to call. and she men­tions all the prod­ucts I so love
we should have a nat­u­ral hair meet up come decem­ber, in nige­ria

I wish, hope and pray that with time Nige­ri­an girls will embrace their nat­u­ral tex­ture and it wont be seen as some­thing out of the ordi­nary

your hair is so freak­ing gor­geous!!

AtEase

+1

Anon

Great idea! I’m Nige­ri­an (via US and UK) and although haven’t vis­it­ed in 5 years (been nat­u­ral 5 years as well), I under­stand the need for a forum where Nige­ri­an wom­en can discuss/buy nat­u­ral hair­care products/generally sup­port one anoth­er re nat­u­ral hair. 

While I’ve expe­ri­enced the typ­i­cal ran­dom com­ments about my hair from Nige­ri­an relatives/friends, it seems per­cep­tions are improv­ing, though. 234Next, a Nige­ri­an news­pa­per, recent­ly ran a fea­ture titled “Curly, Pret­ty Things” on Nige­ri­an wom­en with nat­u­ral hair in their beau­ty sec­tion. There’s hope yet!

http://234next.com/csp/cms/sites/Next/ArtsandCulture/Elan/Beauty/5544350–147/story.csp

AtEase

Just please don’t for­get the hair sci­ence part. There are rea­sons why coconut and shea work well. There are also rea­sons why a strict­ly co-wash­ing rou­tine does not work for every­one. (and why min­er­al oil isn’t nec­es­sar­i­ly the BEST but is not EVIL) Knowl­edge about hair is empow­er­ing. Keep up the good work.

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