Lupi­ta Nyong’o’s sky high sculpt­ed updo may have sparked a trend after she rocked the look at the 2016 Met Gala. The updo was inspired by singer Nina Simone as well as tra­di­tion­al West African styles. 

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 02: Lupita Nyong'o attends the "Manus x Machina: Fashion In An Age Of Technology" Costume Institute Gala at Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 2, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY — MAY 02: Lupi­ta Nyong’o attends the Cos­tume Insti­tute Gala at Met­ro­pol­i­tan Muse­um of Art. (Lar­ry Busacca/Getty Images)

Late­ly, women have been rock­ing the dra­mat­ic high bun. Whether you call it a nin­ja bun or a cone bun, one thing is for cer­tain — the style is an eye catch­er! Take a look at 18 sky high buns that cer­tain­ly caught our eye.

She nailed it. 

@chimeedwards
@chimeedwards

Lov­ing the col­or and fad­ed sides. 

@unicorntails.me
@unicorntails.me

3X

@_gabriellemorris
@_gabriellemorris

The per­fect sum­mer style. 

@jourdanparis
@jourdanparis

Angles. 

@miss_bettyboop
@miss_bettyboop

Mono­chro­mat­ic. 

@touchedbyty_
@touchedbyty_

Sim­plic­i­ty. 

@sweetdarkiee_
@sweetdarkiee_

She took it to the next lev­el. 

@hairbyprincess
@hairbyprincess

Dou­ble trou­ble. 

@royalimagestudio
@royalimagestudio

Actu­al­ly, red heads have more fun. 

@libbybsosweet
@libbybsosweet

She makes the side swoop look chic. 

@shayes_dvine_perfection
@shayes_dvine_perfection

The hair jew­el­ry is a nice touch. 

@shiettaslays
@shiettaslays

Her high­light and bun are both on fleek. 

@jezra_m
@jezra_m

Details. 

@hisandhersunisexsalon
@hisandhersunisexsalon

She’s show­ing us how its done. 

@beauty_by_namy
@beauty_by_namy

Gor­geous. 

@__melanin_made
@__melanin_made

So unique. 

@thequeenofyarnlocs
@thequeenofyarnlocs

Pho­to shoot ready. 

@ashley.sierra
@ashley.sierra

Ladies, would you rock this unique bun?

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15 Comments on "[Pics] The Lupita Effect? Black Women are Rocking West African-Style High Buns"

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Audrey kadi-bonde

Black peo­ple that gage oth­er peo­ple for their black­ness or lack of or are the banes of my life. There is no decree that dic­tates how we inter­pret our her­itage.

Sabrina black

It’s very nice to see that they don’t feel weird wear­ing this. They show con­fi­dence. It’s good.

Oratilwe

Okay, wait I’m a lit­tle con­fused here… non-Black peo­ple wear­ing corn­rows is cul­tur­al appro­pri­a­tion but non-West African women sport­ing this style is a fash­ion trend ?

Earths_Child

These are AFRICAN amer­i­can women, how does the two exam­ples you gave cor­re­late?

Tanaquil

There’s always that one per­son lol

Oratilwe
Cul­ture and race aren’t the same thing. You don’t inher­it a cul­ture by inher­it­ing a race. Hence why in many cul­tures, through the mar­riage of peo­ple of two dif­fer­ent races, one may choose to adopt the cul­ture of the oth­er. I’m not mean­ing to sound scathing in just gen­uine­ly con­fused as to why African Amer­i­cans do not also feel the need to call out black peo­ple who wear bindis, dashikis, the ying and yang sym­bol and a west African hair­style all while not being part of/practicing Hin­du, North African, Asian or West African cul­ture. Why is * that* appro­pri­a­tion not a… Read more »
Ganadora Loteria

Agreed.

As a Caribbean and Lati­na woman, my cul­tures con­tin­ue to be stolen from and appro­pri­at­ed by non-black peo­ple and black/African Amer­i­cans alike, main­ly in the form of music and expres­sion. We always speak about it amongst our­selves but when­ev­er we bring it to the atten­tion of black/African Amer­i­cans, it is hard­ly ever addressed as cul­tur­al appro­pri­a­tion.

I under­stand that some lines are blurred, espe­cial­ly due to migra­tion, etc but some cul­tur­al ref­er­ences are clear­ly dis­tinc­tive and cred­it should be giv­en to the cul­tures and peo­ples that they stem from.

Oratilwe

Yes !!! It’s an issue.

Alberta Atieno
Hi, I will take the time to edu­cate you on this. Appro­pri­a­tion is when anoth­er cul­ture claims ele­ments of oth­er peo­ples cul­ture for itself with­out acknowl­edg­ing the ori­gins of said cul­ture. It also involves car­i­ca­tur­ing said cul­ture and prof­it­ing from the com­mod­i­fi­ca­tion of that cul­ture at the expense of the cul­ture from which it is derived. e.g. box­er braids are not corn­rows and corn­rows are known by dif­fer­ent names in Africa. How­ev­er, Back Amer­i­cans do not dis­pute the African ori­gins of said style plus, they are dias­po­ra peo­ple of African descent. On the oth­er hand White main­stream Amer­i­can media present… Read more »
Shannon Page
Here is my stab at it. Most African-Amer­i­can peo­ple have descend­ed from slaves, the cul­ture in which you are stat­ing they are appro­pri­at­ing was robbed from them gen­er­a­tions ago. So when you see West­ern African-Amer­i­cans wear­ing dashikis and the hair styles as above it is their attempt to reclaim their her­itage that was essen­tial­ly stolen from them. They are not try­ing to steal any­thing, but reclaim and take their place in what would be their cul­ture had they not been stolen from Africa.  Now “appro­pri­a­tion” can only hap­pen when the dom­i­nate cul­ture, i.e. Euro­pean takes some­thing from a non-dom­i­nate cul­ture… Read more »
Earths_Child
No, I total­ly didn’t take it the wrong way. You did make good points and I got under­stand­ing from what you men­tioned. But a lot of times I hon­est­ly feel as if when us African Amer­i­can women do try to embrace African cul­ture we are treat­ed as if we aren’t good enough or not African enough to do so. I find it beau­ti­ful that AA peo­ple are actu­al­ly tak­ing time to embrace that lost iden­ti­ty of our­selves. We don’t see it that deep, we see it as a start­ing point in lov­ing our­selves and root. As for the reli­gion aspect,… Read more »
Benita

I AM African Amer­i­can and I’m con­fused about it. Its a gen­uine ques­tion. While we might share the same col­or of skin, I know good and well I do not share the cul­ture! So while I have seen some beau­ti­ful African dress­es sold by West Africans in my city; I do not buy. I feel I would be a fraud.

Oratilwe

I feel it’s all about con­text though. Like I see some of my African a Mar­i­an sis­ters wear­ing a dashiki(West African), nde­bele necklaces(used to adorn and celebrate/mark a woman’s aging), ban­tu knots (zulu), and a red bin­di (used to sym­bol­ise mar­riage)

But not under­stand what’s wrong with that or why some­one would he upset by it. We’re upset because you’re wear­ing items of oth­er people’s cul­tures in the wrong con­text !!!!
You wouldn’t wear a wed­ding dress to a fes­ti­val just for vibes. Why? Because you under­stand that mar­riage us sacred 

Get where I’m com­ing from?

TWA4now

YES! I love the style!

Guest

They all look nice. I like the first one the best.

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