[Pics] The Lupita Effect? Black Women are Rocking West African-Style High Buns

Lupita Nyong’o’s sky high sculpted updo may have sparked a trend after she rocked the look at the 2016 Met Gala. The updo was inspired by singer Nina Simone as well as traditional West African styles.

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 02: Lupita Nyong'o attends the "Manus x Machina: Fashion In An Age Of Technology" Costume Institute Gala at Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 2, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MAY 02: Lupita Nyong’o attends the Costume Institute Gala at Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Larry Busacca/Getty Images)

Lately, women have been rocking the dramatic high bun. Whether you call it a ninja bun or a cone bun, one thing is for certain – the style is an eye catcher! Take a look at 18 sky high buns that certainly caught our eye.

She nailed it. 

@chimeedwards

@chimeedwards

Loving the color and faded sides. 

@unicorntails.me

@unicorntails.me

3X

@_gabriellemorris

@_gabriellemorris

The perfect summer style. 

@jourdanparis

@jourdanparis

Angles. 

@miss_bettyboop

@miss_bettyboop

Monochromatic. 

@touchedbyty_

@touchedbyty_

Simplicity. 

@sweetdarkiee_

@sweetdarkiee_

She took it to the next level. 

@hairbyprincess

@hairbyprincess

Double trouble. 

@royalimagestudio

@royalimagestudio

Actually, red heads have more fun. 

@libbybsosweet

@libbybsosweet

She makes the side swoop look chic. 

@shayes_dvine_perfection

@shayes_dvine_perfection

The hair jewelry is a nice touch. 

@shiettaslays

@shiettaslays

Her highlight and bun are both on fleek. 

@jezra_m

@jezra_m

Details. 

@hisandhersunisexsalon

@hisandhersunisexsalon

She’s showing us how its done. 

@beauty_by_namy

@beauty_by_namy

Gorgeous. 

@__melanin_made

@__melanin_made

So unique. 

@thequeenofyarnlocs

@thequeenofyarnlocs

Photo shoot ready. 

@ashley.sierra

@ashley.sierra

Ladies, would you rock this unique bun?

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15 thoughts on “[Pics] The Lupita Effect? Black Women are Rocking West African-Style High Buns

  1. Okay, wait I’m a little confused here… non-Black people wearing cornrows is cultural appropriation but non-West African women sporting this style is a fashion trend ?

      • Culture and race aren’t the same thing. You don’t inherit a culture by inheriting a race.
        Hence why in many cultures, through the marriage of people of two different races, one may choose to adopt the culture of the other.

        I’m not meaning to sound scathing in just genuinely confused as to why African Americans do not also feel the need to call out black people who wear bindis, dashikis, the ying and yang symbol and a west African hairstyle all while not being part of/practicing Hindu, North African, Asian or West African culture.

        Why is * that* appropriation not a problem?

        (Please please don’t come for me. I’m genuinely asking. And although it may not come across through text but I’m asking in the most humble way I know how)

        – a south African, black girl

        • I AM African American and I’m confused about it. Its a genuine question. While we might share the same color of skin, I know good and well I do not share the culture! So while I have seen some beautiful African dresses sold by West Africans in my city; I do not buy. I feel I would be a fraud.

          • I feel it’s all about context though. Like I see some of my African a Marian sisters wearing a dashiki(West African), ndebele necklaces(used to adorn and celebrate/mark a woman’s aging), bantu knots (zulu), and a red bindi (used to symbolise marriage)

            But not understand what’s wrong with that or why someone would he upset by it. We’re upset because you’re wearing items of other people’s cultures in the wrong context !!!!
            You wouldn’t wear a wedding dress to a festival just for vibes. Why? Because you understand that marriage us sacred

            Get where I’m coming from?

        • No, I totally didn’t take it the wrong way. You did make good points and I got understanding from what you mentioned. But a lot of times I honestly feel as if when us African American women do try to embrace African culture we are treated as if we aren’t good enough or not African enough to do so. I find it beautiful that AA people are actually taking time to embrace that lost identity of ourselves. We don’t see it that deep, we see it as a starting point in loving ourselves and root. As for the religion aspect, a lot of African Americans have indeed strayed away from the typical Christianity religion and stepped more into more African based spirituality systems (I am one of them)..I find it beautiful that AA people are actually trying to embrace that part of them that’s been a faded identity for DECADES…and choosing to let go of the European tactics that stood strongly for generations. Yes, you do have some that only wear those things for a trend and lack “knowledge of self.” But at the end of the day, they have that freedom to do as they please. We really have to stop that division between Africans and Africans Americans, there’s like this tug of one looking at the other with a false sense of superiority…when at the end of the day we are one.

        • Here is my stab at it. Most African-American people have descended from slaves, the culture in which you are stating they are appropriating was robbed from them generations ago. So when you see Western African-Americans wearing dashikis and the hair styles as above it is their attempt to reclaim their heritage that was essentially stolen from them. They are not trying to steal anything, but reclaim and take their place in what would be their culture had they not been stolen from Africa.

          Now “appropriation” can only happen when the dominate culture, i.e. European takes something from a non-dominate culture and tries to make it something new, hip, or stylish w/o knowing the significance of the tradition, or giving proper credit where it is due. Most African-Americans do not actively chose to participate in the dominate European culture, but must in order to survive, which is called assimilation. An African-American wearing something from another culture (Native American, Indian, Asian etc) is not considered appropriating because African-Americans do not have the power or history behind subjugating and eliminating said cultures, i.e. bindis, yin/yang etc.

        • Hi,

          I will take the time to educate you on this. Appropriation is when another culture claims elements of other peoples culture for itself without acknowledging the origins of said culture. It also involves caricaturing said culture and profiting from the commodification of that culture at the expense of the culture from which it is derived. e.g. boxer braids are not cornrows and cornrows are known by different names in Africa. However, Back Americans do not dispute the African origins of said style plus, they are diaspora people of African descent. On the other hand White mainstream American media present these styles as their 21st century style inventions and profit from them.

          When Africans wear Bindis or Saris, please note that we are aware that these are foreign garments and adornments. We have never claimed them. Please note that we do not have industries in Africa to mass produce and market plagiarized versions of other societies innovations, garb, etc. Also note that we pay full price for them to the originators of these types of cultural exchanges i.e. Indians, Chinese, Europeans and Americans.

          When fashion houses develop African inspired lines they rarely bother to acknowledge the source of said inspiration. Non-black hair gurus pass off Bantu Knots as ‘Star Trek Inspired’ styles etc. and big cosmetic brands do not think twice of using tribal symbols for brand profit -see Mac Vibe Tribe Controversy- while excluding the societies they backhandedly plagiarize from profit proceeds i.e no corporate social responsibility.

          In Kenya where i am from British firms have used our societies ignorance to try and copyright and patent tangible cultural elements such as;- the Kikoy cloth, the Kanga (leso) etc.

          The traditional multi-purpose bag that Kikuyu women use -the Kiondoo/ Kiondo has been registered as a Japanese trademarked good on the sly before we Kenyans even caught wind of it.

          http://allafrica.com/stories/200703011145.html

          All said, its not difficult to understand our heavy suspicion as conscious black people of foreigners wearing tangible elements of our cultures.

        • Agreed.

          As a Caribbean and Latina woman, my cultures continue to be stolen from and appropriated by non-black people and black/African Americans alike, mainly in the form of music and expression. We always speak about it amongst ourselves but whenever we bring it to the attention of black/African Americans, it is hardly ever addressed as cultural appropriation.

          I understand that some lines are blurred, especially due to migration, etc but some cultural references are clearly distinctive and credit should be given to the cultures and peoples that they stem from.

  2. Black people that gage other people for their blackness or lack of or are the banes of my life. There is no decree that dictates how we interpret our heritage.

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