Since Solange Knowles debuted her third studio album, A Seat at the Table, in September it has remained a consistent topic of conversation. The Billboard number one album is a testament to how much Solange has grown as an artist. Songs like Rise and Cranes give voice to the deep struggles that black women face.

Solange Knowles' album, A Seat at the Table, was released on September 30, 2016.
Solange Knowles’ album, A Seat at the Table, was released on September 30, 2016.

What most don’t know is that the album was inspired by a racist conversation between two white men, which Solange recently discussed with Q2 Music podcast host Helga Davis.

In 2013, Solange made a comment on Twitter that didn’t sit well with some. She said that white journalists should know about “deep Brandy album cuts” and have a holistic understanding of black music before offering grades and reviews of R&B albums. The New York Times reached out to the singer to appear on a podcast to discuss her comments. She declined but the host of the podcast, Jon Caramanica, discussed them anyway. A writer and guest on the show, also a white man, noted that the attendees of Solange’s concerts were overwhelmingly white, and she should be careful not to upset them by questioning their knowledge of black music.

“The turning point happened when, essentially, I was on Twitter professing my love for the artist Brandy, who I’m a massive fan of. And there were a lot of White indie music critics who criticized, actually, me professing this undying love for Brandy. … I essentially challenged writers that if they were writing about R&B music, that they needed to know who Brandy was. And that was not warmly received from everyone. …

The New York Times was doing a podcast and they invited me to be a part of it and it was on cultural tourism. … And I declined. I didn’t really see any incentive for me to be involved in that conversation and in that way. I didn’t feel the need to have a debate about something that I was culturally a part of, and I didn’t feel the need to defend that. So they brought up my comments on this podcast, and the writer, who was a White male actually said, “I went to Solange’s concert and I noted who her audience was, and if I were her, I’d be careful of making these statements because I’d be careful not to bite the hand that feeds me.”

The not so subtle racist remark bothered Solange for years, and thus A Seat at the Table was born.

“I began to think a lot about that conversation and replaying it, and it haunted me. And it haunted my mother to hear someone telling her daughter ‘don’t bite the hand that feeds you’ And also the racial subtleties—[that] are not so subtle—of what that encompasses when you say that to a Black woman. Then you connect it by saying ‘Do you know who’s buying your records?’ So I was essentially being told to shut up.”

Instead of allowing herself to be silenced, Solange created an album that is exquisite and powerful – an album that forces listeners to cry, laugh, self-reflect, rejoice, and demand. The exchange was a turning point for  Solange as an artist and we’re glad that she used that moment to tap into her Black Girl Magic and create an album that basically says…screw you.

Listen to the complete podcast interview here.

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10 Comments on "A White Music Writer Told Solange Not to ‘Bite the Hand That Feeds Her’ By Pissing Off Her White Fans"

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RACIST

I hope Solange does piss whites off so these liberal idiots learn the truth about race.

notconvincedgranny

White privilege at it’s nadir. Now we have a white man telling a black woman about being black.

Samantha

I have that album. It’s my first Solange album and I loooove it! That remark was very racist. Who in the heck do he think he is to fix his mouth and say that about her? She’s a grown beautiful Black and proud Woman! As an artist you have a freedom of expression. Everyone will not like it. That’s life. I hope he received and understood her message loud and clear with her last album.

Karminia

I’m so glad that she used that experience in order to actually grow and show how much she appreciates her roots. You can’t write or sing just for your fans you have to do it for yourself as well and she managed to do it with so much soul poured into it. I mean “please don’t touch my hair” is still on the top of my playlist up to this very day. She twirled all over that hate.

Beverly Kesse

She has grown so much as an artist over the past years and I love her music so much!! It may not be the most popular opinion but she is my favourite knowles sister. It is important to focus on how she has grown not what people who don’t know her music are saying! love her!!
http://bevseyeview.com/

Jaynie Murphy Bullock
Jaynie Murphy Bullock

I will admit that I have slept on Solange’s music. Never was my style. But I heard the song, Craines and it is so deep and her voice is so good. She has a new fin in me.

Pot BW

I’m looking at the related articles and Solange is really building her brand — she is rocking of course the natural hair and she has a PUMA Collection. I am so proud of her. I support her — boss moves Solange.

Pot BW

Like Solange says This Sh*t is for Us. Who are white people to try to define black music for us? They need to STFU! It doesn’t come from them — it comes from our Souls something white people have tried so hard for so many years to emulate — but could never understand. Copycat us is the best that they can do. I am loving Solange’s new CD and I will pay to see her in concert.

kaydenpat

Wow. Solange is pretty deep. Love her!

FeeFee

This is why I love Solange. White society told her to stop complaining and she responded with an epic f*ck you album!

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